Installing a tabernacle to the mast of the DaySailer

Posted: August 27, 2017 in Boat restoration, Restoration
Tags: , ,

It has been awhile since I have posted about the 1982 O’day DaySailer I bought last year. You can read about in a previous post called New boat, New Project.

I did the shake down sail earlier this year to determine what really needs to be done to the boat. This particular model of sailboats has a 23 foot tall mast that has to drop through the deck when installing the mast. This is a bit of a challenge and requires several people to do this safely. After some research I decided to install a tabernacle system which allows for a much easier time of raising the mast.

I ordered the part from D&R Marine. It came with very easy to follow directions. The most intimidating part of this project is cutting your mast so make sure you measure carefully.  You will actually make two cuts so measure and mark both spots before you do any cutting.

After cutting the mast I installed the bottom half of the tabernacle to the short piece that was the bottom of the mast.


I used a chop saw made to cut metal to insure that I made the cut straight. You will also need a drill and tap plus there was some filing I had to do in order to remove the barbs from the cut.


I dropped this part through the deck and connected it to the bottom of the boat with a drill, tap and stainless steel screws provided by D&R Marine.

 

 

 

Once it is installed you can see that the tabernacle sits just above the deck. The whole plate is stainless steel so no worries of it rusting.


The top half of the tabernacle is installed on the bottom of the long piece of the mast after cutting an additional 1.5 inches.


This system works beautifully and I was able to raise the mast safely on my own. You slide the first pin through which allows the mast to pivot.


I could lift the mast and use the line and pulley for the jib to help lift it into place. Once it straightens, all that was left was to insert the back pin that holds the whole thing in place.


This whole system allowed me to raise the mast easier and safer by myself than before with the help of three other people. I am excited to take the boat out again in a few weeks.

Comments
  1. Scott Dufault says:

    I have a similar boat and mast hinge. Unfortunately, I tried to raise the mast with the hinge, but walked away to get some assistance, and returned to find the mast fell sideways to port, bending the hinge. I am interested in the procedure you follow to raise the mast. I am also unclear as to the proper main sheet line arrangement. Any photos of how you rig your main sheet?

    • robmarks says:

      I will try to describe this but feel free to ask clarifying question. I use the main sheet line attached to the front of the trailer to help raise the mast and then tie it off to hold the mast in place while I put the front hinge pin in. I have the two side stays already in place when I raise the mast. With the pins and stays in place the only thing left to do is connect the front stay.

      This weekend I can take some pictures of how the main sheet is rigged.

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